Diagnostic conundrum: Classic Hodgkin Lymphoma or a mimic?
img 1
img 1
img 1
img 1
img 1
img 1

The past decade has seen considerable diagnostic advances distinguishing classic Hodgkin lymphoma (CHL) from other lymphoma mimics. Currently, because of both speed and convenience, immunohistochemistry is the gold standard in diagnosing CHL. However, there are significant potential diagnostic difficulties of CHL, including several clinically relevant mimics.

With an eye towards driving patient care and advancing outcomes, pathologists play a critical role in revealing both accurate and precise tumor subtypes to apply the right treatment course. There is a high personal and treatment cost to a wrong diagnosis, and it is the responsibility of the pathologist to get it right - 100% of the time. To sort out common or challenging issues in pathology, we partnered with the American Registry of Pathology and Annals of Diagnostic Pathology on a series of expert approaches in diagnostic pathology. In the first of our series of articles, we focus on CHL, recommending a panel of studies for primary identification. Important differential diagnoses and their approaches are also discussed at length.

To read more on the immunohistochemical evaluation of classic Hodgkin Lymphoma and diagnostic mimics, please download the paper below:

Dennis P. O'Malley MD profile image

About Dennis P. O’Malley, MD

Senior Hematopathologist

About Dennis P. O’Malley, MD

Senior Hematopathologist

Dr. O’Malley currently serves as a Hematopathologist at NeoGenomics and as an Adjunct Associated Professor at MD Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas. Dr. O’Malley completed two Hematopathology fellowships, one at Duke University and the second at Carolinas Medical Center. Dr. O’Malley has authored numerous articles, books and book chapters. He is the author of Atlas of Splenic Pathology, as well as a co-author of the AFIP Fascicle of Neoplastic Disorders of Lymph Node and Spleen, and was the first author on the AFIP Fascicle on Non-Neoplastic Disorders of Lymph Node and Spleen. Recent publications include chapters in Dabbs’ Diagnostic Immunohistochemistry and Hsi’s Hematopathology. Dr. O’Malley teaches at a broad range of venues. In addition to teaching at medical schools, residencies (such as MD Anderson, UCLA and USC) and state pathology societies, he also teaches courses for USCAP. He has served on several national committees including the CAP Immunohistochemistry Committee, and Cancer Biomarker Reporting Panel on both Myeloid disease and Lymphoma. Dr. O’Malley’s areas of diagnostic expertise include adult and pediatric bone marrow diseases, lymphomas, cutaneous hematologic disorders, splenic pathology, immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry and molecular diagnostics. Dr. O’Malley is the chairman of the American Registry of Pathology, best known for producing the AFIP Fascicles, among other educational projects.

Visit Dr. O’Malley on Twitter: @DennisOMalleyMD

These articles reflect the views of a group of experienced practitioners in subspecialty practice, with the goal to provide practical and useful guides to a specific diagnosis or problem area.